Vacancy: Assistant Editor, Irish Journal of Arts Management & Cultural Policy

7 April 2014

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Vacancy: Assistant Editor, Irish Journal of Arts Management & Cultural Policy (www.culturalpolicy.ie) (temporary; part-time)

School of Art History & Cultural Policy, University College Dublin
Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology

(download spec as PDF)

Organization Description

The Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy (www.culturalpolicy.ie) is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal publishing original research on the arts and cultural sector in Ireland. An initiative sponsored by School of Art History and Cultural Policy, University College Dublin (UCD) and Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology (IADT), it seeks to provide a readable and engaging discussion of recent arts management and cultural policy research for academics and practitioners, encourage new research directions in the sector and offer a platform for aspiring researchers and writers. The Journal’s aims include to:

  • Disseminate high quality, recent academic research on all aspects of Irish arts management and cultural policy in an accessible, dynamic and professionally designed format
  • Serve as an educational resource for arts management and cultural policy professionals, and students studying related topics
  • Support the skill development of professionals working in the arts and cultural sector
  • Encourage debate on topical issues related to arts and cultural management/policy
  • Support and grow a vibrant Irish research community, allowing for the exchange of ideas and promoting research collaborations between individuals and organizations

Articles published by the Journal span the following areas:

  • cultural policy
  • arts and cultural management
  • cultural tourism and the creative industries
  • cultural economics and finance
  • heritage and museum studies
  • arts education
  • governance and administration
  • arts marketing
  • audience development and participation
  • philanthropy / fundraising
  • cultural production / consumption

The project is edited and managed by an editorial team of academics, with further input from its international advisory board.

Role

We are currently seeking expressions of interest in the role of Assistant Editor for Issue 2 of IJAMCP. This role provides an excellent opportunity to gain experience in editing and online publishing, and would be especially suitable for recent graduates (or current PhDs) of postgraduate programmes in related disciplines.

Working in conjunction with the Editorial Board, the Assistant Editor will be responsible for assistance with copy editing, administration tasks, correspondence and online editing/layout. This is a flexible, part-time, and temporary project role which is unpaid, but carries a stipend of €500. Running from May 2014-May 2015, the time commitment is variable but will be approximately 3-5 hours weekly. Bi-monthly meetings in Dublin will be required, but otherwise the candidate may be based anywhere.

Candidates should possess:

  • a postgraduate qualification in Arts Management, Cultural Policy or a related field
  • demonstrated research achievement and strong knowledge of the Irish cultural sector
  • strong working knowledge of word processing software and ability to quickly learn online content management systems
  • attention to detail and excellent editing/writing skills
  • ability to work independently and with access to own laptop/computer

Please forward on a CV and cover letter expressing your interest in the role to info@culturalpolicy.ie by Friday, 25 April 2014.


Launch of Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy

9 October 2013

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JOURNAL LAUNCH

The School of Art History and Cultural Policy at University College Dublin is delighted to announce the launch of the Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy (www.culturalpolicy.ie), a new peer reviewed, open access e-journal publishing original research on the arts and cultural sector in Ireland.

It aims to provide an accessible and engaging discussion of recent arts management and cultural policy research for academics and practitioners, encourage new research directions in the sector and offer a platform for aspiring researchers and writers. Contents of the first issue include:

Editorial Board Introduction

Ciarán Benson Foreword

Michelle Carew Towards Creative Europe: Irish Performing Arts Organisations and the EU Culture Programme

Timothy King Tapping the Culturati: An Underexploited Source of Private Finance for the Arts in Ireland

Eve Lalor Safeguarding Giving: the Volunteer and the Intern

Thomas McGraw Lewis Challenging the Literacy of ‘Literacy and Numeracy’: The Potential for Film and Moving Image Media in the Irish Educational Landscape

Emma Mahony Where Do They Stand? Deviant Art Institutions and the Liberal Democratic State

CALL FOR PAPERS – ISSUE 2

Accompanying the launch of Issue 1, the Editorial Board is now currently seeking outstanding research articles by academics and practitioners for Issue 2 of the Journal. Submissions should address topics concerning Ireland or Northern Ireland, may focus on any of the following areas:

  • cultural policy
  • arts and cultural management
  • cultural tourism
  • creative industries
  • cultural economics and marketing
  • heritage and museum studies
  • governance and administration
  • audience development and participation
  • philanthropy/fundraising
  • cultural finance
  • production / consumption
  • arts and education

The Journal is published annually and edited by an Editorial Board comprised of Irish academics. All research-based submissions are blind peer-reviewed by an international panel of academics and practitioners. If you are interested in submitting to the journal, please email a brief abstract and article title to info@culturalpolicy.ie by 1 November 2013. We also welcome proposals for book reviews and editorial essays. Final submissions (4,000-5,000 words) will be due 6 December 2013. Full submission guidelines and further details may be found at www.culturalpolicy.ie.

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Editorial Board:

Pat Cooke, University College Dublin
Victoria Durrer, South Dublin County Council
Emily Mark-FitzGerald, University College Dublin
Kerry McCall, Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dún Laoghaire

International Advisory Board:

Eleanora Belfiore, University of Warwick
Oliver Bennett, University of Warwick
Constance Devereaux, Colorado State University
Luke Gibbons, NUI Maynooth
Chris Maughan, De Montfort University
Andrew Newman, Newcastle University
Dave O’Brien, City University, London
John O’Hagan, Trinity College Dublin
Carmel O’Sullivan, Trinity College Dublin
Bernadette Quinn, Dublin Institute of Technology
Marie Redmond, Trinity College Dublin
Elizabeth Silva, The Open University
David Throsby, Macquarie University
Jonathan Vickery, University of Warwick
Chris Whitehead, Newcastle University


Artsmanagement.ie round-up: 20 August 2013

20 August 2013

Screen Shot 2013-08-20 at 12.43.07

Counting down two weeks until the new UCD term begins: autumn is upon us! Which also means the arts scene is warming up again…

The programme for Culture Night is launching today; the growth of this event is nothing short of astonishing; it’s the biggest night of the year for Dublin and many other towns who’ve adopted it. Unmissable.

The Dublin Fringe Festival also recently announced its line-up. As director Roise Goan’s swan song, it’s packed full of treats. So difficult to choose highlights, but I’ll be booking/attending Anu Productions’ Thirteen cycle (13 performances/events reflecting on the Dublin Lockout); Fit/Misfit (collaboration between Mexican and Irish dancers); Lippy by Dead Centre; for a bit of light relief, David O’Doherty and Maeve Higgins both have shows; and Brat Kids Carnival for my kiddies. For starters.

The centenary of the Dublin Lockout is receiving lots of attention at the moment – especially from Anu Productions (both at the Fringe and part of the brilliant, almost sold-out Tenement Experience) – but many other related events are listed at http://1913committee.ie. Some of the most interesting include Pallas Project’s A Letter to Lucy, a response to 1913 by a group of contemporary artists (Anthony Haughey, Deirdre O Mahony, Mark Curran, Deirdre Power, Jennie Guy, Brian Duggan) in a number of locations around Dublin (until 21 September). The Labour and Lockout exhibition at the Limerick City Gallery also looks fascinating (on until 1 October). Finally Temple Bar Gallery & Studios has issued an open call for workshop proposals for its Workers’ Cafe: from 10 October – 2 November, their exhibition space will transform into a participatory venue and cafe, hosting events and workshops connected to the subject of labour, economy and exchange.

We’re smack dab in the middle of Heritage Week – their listing of events is like a phone book! There’s something going on in every corner of the country — check in to your local museum or heritage centre to see what special programmes are on offer this week.

The most recent NCFA research colloquy in Kilkenny last week featured Dave O’Brien from City University London speaking on the evolution of evidence-based policy making in the UK, with a response by John O’Hagan (TCD, Economics). The session made for a lively debate on the pros/cons of evidence gathering methods and their use by decision-makers (some of the debate was captured via twitter – #ncfacolloquy). The next colloquy will take place in October: these are well worth attending if you’ve an interest in the arts sector, policy-making and the role of research.

Who else is worn out from all of the appeals to vote for projects that are part of the Arthur Guinness Project scheme? Their dire daily voting mechanism has been clogging up inboxes and feeds over the past few weeks, but Jim Carroll has a bigger bone to pick in his Irish Times blog. His critique of the scheme has attracted a huge number of comments: well worth a read for the range of arguments coming from all perspectives.

Temple Bar Gallery and Studios is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year with a forthcoming book Generation – 30 years of creativity at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, which recognizes the important contribution it has made to Ireland’s visual arts community. Its upcoming exhibition False Memory Syndrome proposes a series of alternative histories for TBG&S, touching on institutional memory, archives and materiality.

Heads up: the Arts Council is looking for new Arts Advisers in Architecture; Circus, Street Arts & Spectacle; Film; Opera; Theatre; and Traditional Arts. Applications close on 26 September.

Lots of new listings on the jobs page, but of particular interest may be the facilitator roles for the Turner Prize 2013 in Derry/Londonderry as part of City of Culture. Derry’s been playing a blinder of late, with an estimated 430,000 turning out for the Fleadh last week. Following a tumultuous summer in Northern Ireland, an interesting article on The Detail blog explores why Derry and the CoC events may hold out hope for the continuation of the peace process.

In the category of you-couldn’t-make-it-up, last week the DUP’s Peter Robinson published a rambling open letter on the subject of the controversial re-development of the Maze prison and its proposed ‘Peace Centre’. The satirical website Loyalists Against Democracy were on fine form with a swift response.

Once again, Dublin City Council has announced plans to redevelop Dublin’s Victorian fruit market (located between Capel St and the Four Courts). We’ve heard this plan before over the years — there’s widespread agreement this is a fantastic idea, but with a proposed opening date of 2015, the proof will be in the pudding.

It’s been a bumper summer for Irish Architecture, and both the Irish Architecture Foundation and the Irish Georgian Society have moved into new digs: the former to Hatch Street near the NCH, the latter in the old Civic Museum on South William Street. In related news, Dublin Civic Trust is sponsoring a conference on the future of Dublin’s Georgian Squares (13 September), to be held appropriately in the ballroom of the former Assembly Rooms of the Rotunda Hospital on Parnell Square.

Finally, some great news in the world of open access: the Getty Museum in LA has joined the Rijksmuseum in The Netherlands as one of the world’s major museums now offering open access to a massive number of images of its collection, free of restriction. As the Rijksmuseum’s head of digital collections has remarked, “If they want to have a Vermeer on their toilet paper, I’d rather have a very high-quality image of Vermeer on toilet paper than a very bad reproduction.” Words to warm any art historian’s heart!


Weekly update: 11 July 2013

11 July 2013

Dublin Tenement Experience

It’s been a real challenge blogging this past semester – tackling new motherhood, taking over directing our MA in Arts Management at UCD while Pat Cooke is on sabbatical, travelling for my new research project and finishing my first book (in addition to the normal day job of the uni lecturer!) has meant the blog’s been neglected, poor thing. I’ve toyed with the idea of stopping, but I appreciate the messages of support (via email and in person) from folks who find it useful, so I’ll soldier bravely on ahead!

I’ll endeavour to ramp up frequency of postings as we head towards the autumn (with a slight rename) — there’s so much exciting activity on the horizon — with the aim of firing on all cylinders by September.

In the meantime, what’s cooking in the Irish arts world under that hot hot sun?

  • Biggest news yesterday was the launch of Dublin Theatre Festival’s new programme. Still need time to drool over the programme, but so far Neutral Hero by the NYC Players, Rape of Lucrece by the Royal Shakespeare Company, the multimedia piece Germinal, Rough Magic’s The Critic and the Danish children’s show A True Tall Tale are tempting me!! See also Irish Theatre Magazine’s complete review of the programme.
  • So many festivals, so little time — on the agenda this month and next is the Galway Arts Festival and Kilkenny Arts Festival (more Shakespeare!) for starters… Clonmel Junction Festival is on now as well with a great programme (on til the 14th).
  • As a new mum myself for the second time round, I think the Mothership Project is a fab idea – it’s an emerging network for Irish visual artists and arts workers (who are also parents!)
  • Another step in the evolution of the Charities Bill… details of a regulatory body were announced yesterday (sorely needed!) and will be funded by a “modest annual registration fee” paid by charities themselves.
  • These days postgraduate scholarships (particularly for taught MAs) are thin on the ground, so y’all should be jumping on the full scholarships currently on offer at NCAD for their MAs in Art & the Contemporary World / Design History & Material Culture (deadline is 22nd July).
  • Delighted to see the sixth edition of Artefact: Journal of the Irish Association of Art Historians is out! I was part of the team which launched the journal back in 2007, and it’s great to see it alive & kicking.
  • Breac is the new online journal in Irish Studies published by the University of Notre Dame, and their upcoming issue (with a call for papers – deadline 15 June) is on contemporary Irish drama.
  • I’m really looking forward to the Dublin Tenement Experience / Living the Lockout project — it’s on for only 9 weeks this summer at no. 14 Henrietta St. in Dublin. The short-term exhibit and performance tells the story of the 1913 Lockout in collaboration with Anu Productions; the hope is that the project will stimulate interest in a permanent exhibition/site interpreting 19th c./early 20th c. Dublin social history (a subject neglected in our heritage landscape).
  • Athlone Art & Heritage has a wonderful and ambitious exhibition programme this summer – including the multimedia exhibition I Hear a New World featuring ‘contemporary visual music’ in collaboration with graduates from the MPhil in MPhil in Music and Media Technologies (TCD), which sounds just fab.
  • The Irish Museums Association and the International Council of Museums (Irish chapter) are teaming up for the first time to offer a public lecture – Fintan O’Toole will be speaking in Waterford about the project A History of Ireland in 100 Objects on 19 July.

In comings & goings…

  • Ireland’s national opera touring company (now known as OTC) has just announced the appointments of Rosemary Collier as the new Executive Director, and Fergus Sheil as Artistic Director.
  • Róise Goan is stepping down as director of the Dublin Fringe Festival (a role she’s occupied since 2008) — and Canadian Kris Nelson is to take her place.
  • Raghnall Ó Floinn was announced as the new Director of the National Museum. As former Head of Collections, his appointment didn’t come as a surprise, and he’ll no doubt be a safe pair of hands as the Museum continues in a difficult funding climate.
  • Whoa nelly: the Chester Beatty Library is hiring two curators – one to manage the East Asian collection, and one for the Western. These jobs are rare as hen’s teeth, and will certainly be sought after.

Scorchio! Get thee into the sunshine.


Weekly round-up: 16 March 2012

16 March 2012

St Patrick's Day by James Mahony, Illustrated London News, 13 March 1847

No better day than St Patrick’s Eve for a weekly round-up!

Yesterday was a busy day for arts folk… Theatre Forum held a large members’ meeting at the National Concert Hall to present its analysis of the recent Arts Council funding decisions to its membership. I’m not sure if/when aspects of their analysis will be made publicly available, but in any case the review’s been sparked by the unexpected extent of the cuts for many organisations, including indications from the Council that the move away from funding companies is being accelerated. The overall picture for music or the visual arts is more unclear, as no information has yet been aggregated to my knowledge. As negotiations and consultations continue, more developments will undoubtedly follow… (** UPDATE: TF has made available notes from the meeting and the presentation made that day; these are freely available, but to download the full report you must be a TF member.)

Same day, same place — Business to Arts held a briefing on their upcoming collaboration with the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., which will roll out a version of its highly successful organisational capacity-building programme here in Ireland. Details are being finalized, but the programme will soon be open to application (with around 20 participants envisaged). Delivered by BtoA and the DeVos Institute of Arts Management (based at the Kennedy Center), the programme will consist of a number of focused training sessions, working groups and one-on-one mentoring (conducted over a two year period) between programme coordinators and senior managers from the selected arts organisations. More details will emerge soon — and will be publicised here and of course on Business to Arts‘ own website. (**UPDATE: A short pdf publication by the DeVos Institute entitled ‘The Cycle: Planning for Success in the Arts‘, summarised during the briefing, provides an overview of their philosophy and approach toward capacity building; download it here.)

The Irish Film Board and FÁS Screen Training Ireland are also sponsoring the participation of two Irish film executives or producers in the Inside Pictures Initiative, which provides professional development and further networking/training in the international film industry. Deadline for applications is today (16 March)!

Gerry Godley’s letter to the Irish Times this week (on behalf of the National Campaign for the Arts) on the proposed ‘rationalising’ of Culture Ireland (stripping it of its independence as an agency) mirrored widely held views in the sector that this is a foolhardy move… no better day than St Patrick’s to reflect on the contribution of the arts to enhancing the Irish reputation abroad, and consider seriously the effect that these ill-considered measures will have on the arts sector’s capacity to deliver high quality artistic experiences.

In related news — tomorrow (17 March) at the RHA, Leviathan Political Cabaret will host a panel discussion on ‘CultureShock: Irish Identity in Crisis?‘ featuring Eugene Downes, Dylan Haskins, Sinead Gleeson, and Rowena Neville as speakers.

Artbeat, Dublin City FM‘s weekly arts magazine programme, is looking for an enthusiastic person to join its team of keen volunteer broadcasters. Artbeat covers all aspects of the arts in Dublin city and county. They’re looking for someone with a finger on the arts pulse, a voice to go with it and a willingness to give an hour on Wednesday evenings over to the live programme. This volunteer role offers great experience with writing, producing, sound mixing and presenting for radio. If interested please email artbeat@dublincityfm.ie outlining previous arts related experiences and what you would like to do on such a radio show. (*UPDATE*: applications are now closed for this role)

Dublin Dance Festival is also looking for volunteers for its May programme in a number of diverse project areas; applications are being accepted until 11 April.

Irish musical theatre (not the most well-developed of genres here!) is coming into its own this month, with the re-staging of Rough Magic’s wonderful Improbably Frequency at the Gaiety (13-24 March), and THISISPOPBABY’s Alice in Funderland coming to the main stage at the Abbey (30 March – 12 May). A lively Cork vs. Dublin debate will be one of the events accompanying Alice’s production — I’m determined not to miss the show this time around!

On 22 March, Dublintellectual is launching a new 10-part series of events (‘City Intersections’) structured around the question ‘What does it mean to be urban in Dublin?’ The initial event offers an intriguing list of speakers (Maeve Higgins, you’re making the rounds!) and I look forward to hearing more about future plans…

On 4 April the Society for Musicology in Ireland is sponsoring a symposium at UCD on the present state of Irish musicology within (and without) the academy.

Two excellent new books on Irish visual culture have been published — Catherine Morris’ Alice Milligan and the Irish Cultural Revival, and Fintan Cullen’s Ireland on Show: Art, Union and Nationhood. Looking forward to getting stuck into both… and congrats to Catherine and Fintan!!

The National Craft Gallery has unveiled a lovely new website — a great counterpart to the wonderful shows at the Kilkenny-based gallery itself.

The Crawford Art Gallery in Cork recently announced that 39 works from AIB’s art collection (donated to the State) will be joining their permanent collection — press release with full details is here.

CoisCéim Broadreach and Dublin City Council are running a drop-in dance programme for over-50s, featuring lessons delivered by choreographers from CoisCéim Dance Theatre. The programme ‘Wild and Wonderful‘ continues now through April, connected also to the Bealtaine Festival 2012 taking place in May.

The Flaneur arts & culture blog (which bills itself as ‘An Illustrated Blog of Global Culture’) is looking for new contributors – although I don’t think a mustache is required, and absinthe is probably optional!

The Guardian’s Culture Professionals Network featured an encouraging story of a recent arts graduate’s search for employment — well worth reading during these days of otherwise gloomy outlooks!

Arts management & policy research is on the brain this week: the HERAValue project blog (‘Measuring the societal impacts of universities’ research into arts and the humanities’) has a very interesting series of posts on valuation methods applied to the arts and humanities; Dave O’Brien (lecturer at City University, London) also recently posted an excellent essay on ‘Economics and the cultural sector: can they achieve a more diplomatic relationship?’ on Opendemocracy.net – well worth a read if economic valuation studies are your thing!


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